I confess it: I am an Idiot.


I am sitting on pins and needles because I am due to receive a delivery this afternoon.
What is it?  Well, a box with three paperback books in it.
I can’t wait.  I really am excited about this.

…and there is where I am truly an idiot.

You see, I wrote this book.  I copyrighted it and sent it out on submissions a long time ago.  It is one of the reasons that I was sidelined from doing any sort of submissions to agents for…let me see…seventeen years. (It’s a long story and involves a villain who is not representative of agents as a group.)  I did continue writing…

I published it in May of 2011, pulled it last month for an overhaul to bring it in line with the other books of my series called ‘The Memphis Cycle’, and have re-released it.

I know this book.  I love it, actually.  Writing it was a joy, and it hurt to have it sidelined with the other works the villain touched.  I self-published it, finally, because I just didn’t have the heart to go through the cycle again.  (My heart has come back, by the way.)  I can recite huge stretches of it from memory.

“Any breath of that kind of talk and I’ll assign you a tour of duty in Mirgissa!  And you KNOW I have the power!”

The rewrite is a sort of prep for the issue of its prequel.

…and I ordered myself some copies to gloat over.

I am, as I said, an idiot…

Re-Release of Pharaoh’s Son


I am delighted to announce that the revised edition of Pharaoh’s Son is now up and running on Kindle.  It will be available in paperback later this week.

Years ago, I saw a photo of a huge (40 ft high) statue that had stood before a large building in what had once been the imperial city of Memphis, now ruined.  It had fallen over.  I looked it and thought ‘I wonder what it was like when that monolith went over…’  And that is how Pharaoh’s Son came about.

Anyone who writes know how story lines seem to go on.  In this case, other stories, taking place before and after Pharaoh’s Son, occurred to me, and I now have a series that I call The Memphis Cycle because of their connection to the city.  I was writing along a timeline, and facts of that timeline, that I had not yet developed when Pharaoh’s Son first was written, were missing from that book.

I am releasing the second book in the Memphis Cycle at the end of this month.  In addition to redesigning the covers for the series, I took time to review and rewrite portions of Pharaoh’s Son to bring it into line with the rest of cycle.

..and it is now out on Kindle.

Here’s the link:
http://www.amazon.com/Pharaohs-Son-Memphis-Cycle-ebook/dp/B0055OPNHQ/ref=sr_1_3?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1368448593&sr=1-3&keywords=diana+wilder

*Phew!  Now to release Mourningtide.

Celebrating – A Task Finished


SMALL CELEBRATIONS
It’s good to be able to open your eyes to the things around you that are worth celebrating, even if they are as small (relatively speaking) as a smile from a stranger that you know would easily become a friend.  Stepping into a brisk May breeze, watching the flowers push their way through the soil, even though you know jolly well you’re a terrible gardener.
Today, though, I’m celebrating completing a task I’d been thinking of for a long time.


I’m writing a series of historical fiction set in Egypt and centered around the city of Memphis.  It is known as ‘The Memphis Cycle’, and that city, and the families that lived and ruled there, provide the thread that ties the stories together.  Three are published, one is  coming out the end of May, another should be coming out in November, and four others are in varying stages of development.  
 
Here are covers 1 & 2.  #2 is scheduled to be published May 31:
 
 
The covers fell into a sort of theme – statuary or sculptures against a background that referred to something in the story.  As the series developed, I began to want them to be visible as a related group.  So I redesigned them, keeping the original ‘art’ work, but putting that into a framework specific to the stories..  These are covers #3 and 4.  #3 is projected to be published November.
 

The line under the image is a hieroglyphic text with the name and attributes of the king ruling at the time of the story.  It seems to be working out.  Here are covers 5 and 6.  #5 is in the works, but it is an involved story and will need another year (maybe two) to complete properly.  #7 is out. 

 

 

What really tickles me is that my entire family is artistic and I guess maybe I can pretend to be. (Pretend is the word, too.) For example, while I work with photographic images for my covers, the figure crouching in the corner of Lord of the Two Lands is my own work and is a silhouette drawing. But I’m celebrating, for certain. It’s something I’ve wanted to do in a long time, and it’s coming on the heels of a new release and a reissue.

So join me in a cup of cyber tea, a glass of cyber wine, a stoup of cyber ale, or maybe some cyber lemonade. I’m celebrating!

 

Uppity Characters



Dorothy Sayers wrote an excellent and fascinating book with the title The Mind of the Maker.  It is actually a treatise on the theology of the Trinity – but since it is told from the focus of a writer, specifically, it is a wonderful read.  You can find  it HERE on Amazon.

She talks of the three parts to a work – the Idea behind the work, the Energy involved in creating the work, and the Power that arises from the work – the reaction that readers have to it, and the way it changes them.  My copy is hopelessly marked up.

One of the most enjoyable discussions (for me) is her talk about the nature of characters, and how they have to arise out of a plot and be firmly centered in the plot to have any reality.  She gives as an example a passage from Writing Aloud by J D Beresford in which he tells about his attempt to write a book based on a character that he dreamed up.  It was a shambles.  The minute he put this character into a story, other characters, arising from the story itself, and conceived of as being in a situation took over.  They were immensely more powerful and more compelling.

Interesting, I thought all those years ago.  Something to mull over and marvel at.

And then it happened in my writing.

Pharaoh’s Son takes its title for the literal translation of the Egyptian term for ‘Prince’.  It is ‘King’s Son’, or ‘Pharaoh’s Son’.  Since the book involves a number of princes, I thought it appropriate.

The main character is a son of Ramesses the Great, well-attested in history with a character that comes through clearly across the centuries.  Historically, he was a scholar and was credited with being the first archaeologist in history.  He served as High Priest of Ptah and Governor of Memphis, and was Crown Prince at the end of his life.  He fulfilled these roles with such distinction that he was remembered as a wise man for centuries after his death.

With these attributes, how can such a character help but be splendid?

Well, my would-be main character was overshadowed by his brother, the Crown Prince of Egypt, who stepped into the story as a quasi-villain, had a turnaround, and ended up stealing the show.  A character in a situation, he was far more powerful than his brother, far more interesting…

The original hero ended up holding his own, and we had two main characters.  It worked.

And it provided for me  a very good illustration of Beresford’s situation.